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North American Diaper Company Begins Research on “Core-less” Diaper
North American Diaper Company Purchases Assets
North American Diaper Company Addresses Global Hygiene Challenge

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North American Diaper Company Begins Research on “Core-less” Diaper

Salt Lake City, UT – Locally owned North American Diaper Company announced today that it has begun research on an advanced diaper core.  Disposable diapers have been maligned because of their environmental impact; more specifically the amount of landfill space.  NADC will engage in research to produce a “core-less” diaper by the end of 2014.  This will reduce the environmental impact of disposable diapers on landfills by 50%. 

The core of a diaper, comprised of a fiber and super absorbent, is 50% of a diaper’s weight and volume.

North American Diaper Company Purchases Assets

February 18, 2013 

Salt Lake City, UT – Locally owned North American Diaper Company announced today that it will purchase the assets of a diaper manufacturer effective April 12, 2013. Company officials are expected to have the officials of the diaper company visit Utah to discuss the transition plan.  The terms of the deal were not disclosed. 

NADC officials expect the asset purchase to provide the Company with more control over its hygiene products and broaden its customer base.

North American Diaper Company Addresses Global Hygiene Challenge

January 10, 2013 

Salt Lake City, UT – Locally owned North American Diaper Company (NADC) announces a program to address a world hygiene challenge: how to supply parents of low income families with quality, affordable diapers.       

In 2010, a study conducted by Kimberly Clark revealed that thirty percent of US parents clean out and reuse soiled diapers.  These same parents are often challenged to decide between feeding their children or buying diapers.  According to the most recent Census data, more than 16 million American children live in poverty.